Know about BEDLINGTON TERRIER

BEDLINGTON TERRIER

Bedlington Terrier

 

 

Introduction

This elegant, flexible dog has a unique shape. Its arched side and racy outline give it immense speed and quickness. A wolf in lamb’s clothing, the Bedlington is unmatched in its ability to pursue and fight alert but hard quarry. Its walk is light and bouncy. Its fur is a combination of soft and hard hair positioning off the skin, affording good quality protection as well as terrific appearance.

The Bedlington is one of the softer terriers, not only in appearance and feel but in personality. It is friendly, loving and faithful.

 

History

The well-known originator of Bedlington was a dog known as “Old Flint” Originally the race was known by the name of “Rodbery Terrier” or “Rothbury.” This name was derived from a popular bitch brought from Staffordshire by a corporation of peg makers who established in Rothbury. The Terriers of this part were accustomed to rat (rodent) hunting underground.
In 1877 the first Bedlington terrier club was formed. In 1948 the Bedlington terrier was documented by the UKC (United Kennel Club).
Description

The Bedlington Terrier is frequently described as having the appearance of a lamb with the heart of the lion, partially due to their linty-textured fur which is trimmed in a “lamb-like” cut. These dogs come in sandy, black and liver coloration. This kind possesses the graying gene which is a governing attribute, causing the fur shade to change from their birth colors of Dark Brown or to Black and silvery (for blues) or mauve color on their bodies with a lighter colored legs and topknot.

The Bedlington has a wedge-shaped head with almond-shaped eyes. Its body shape is diverse from most of the other terriers in terms of structure, similar to a       sight-hound more than a classic terrier, which make them able run at a great speed. Though, the face assemblies of these dogs that is upper arms, shoulders and front legs are constructed in a different way from any other breed, the front legs are much closer at the feet than at the elbows, making a triangular shape when viewed from the front side. This enables them to turn or spin around rapidly when chasing quarry at high very speed.

Bedlington Terrier

 

Care

The fur sheds little to no hair and needs particular clipping every six weeks. The fur is thinned and clipped close to the head and body to emphasize the shape. Shave the ears leaving a bobble on the tips. On the legs, the hair is left somewhat longer. Brush the dog frequently and clean the pluck within the ears. Even though regular bathing will not dry out skin, it should not be washed too often or the fur will become dull, which is not considered suitable for the breed. Dogs that are to be shown need good quality of grooming.

 

Introduction

This elegant, flexible dog has a unique shape. Its arched side and racy outline give it immense speed and quickness. A wolf in lamb’s clothing, the Bedlington is unmatched in its ability to pursue and fight alert but hard quarry. Its walk is light and bouncy. Its fur is a combination of soft and hard hair positioning off the skin, affording good quality protection as well as terrific appearance.

The Bedlington is one of the softer terriers, not only in appearance and feel but in personality. It is friendly, loving and faithful.

 

 

History

The well-known originator of Bedlington was a dog known as “Old Flint” Originally the race was known by the name of “Rodbery Terrier” or “Rothbury.” This name was derived from a popular bitch brought from Staffordshire by a corporation of peg makers who established in Rothbury. The Terriers of this part were accustomed to rat (rodent) hunting underground.
In 1877 the first Bedlington terrier club was formed. In 1948 the Bedlington terrier was documented by the UKC (United Kennel Club).
 

 

Description

The Bedlington Terrier is frequently described as having the appearance of a lamb with the heart of the lion, partially due to their linty-textured fur which is trimmed in a “lamb-like” cut. These dogs come in sandy, black and liver coloration. This kind possesses the graying gene which is a governing attribute, causing the fur shade to change from their birth colors of Dark Brown or to Black and silvery (for blues) or mauve color on their bodies with a lighter colored legs and topknot.

The Bedlington has a wedge-shaped head with almond-shaped eyes. Its body shape is diverse from most of the other terriers in terms of structure, similar to a       sight-hound more than a classic terrier, which make them able run at a great speed. Though, the face assemblies of these dogs that is upper arms, shoulders and front legs are constructed in a different way from any other breed, the front legs are much closer at the feet than at the elbows, making a triangular shape when viewed from the front side. This enables them to turn or spin around rapidly when chasing quarry at high very speed.

 

Care

The fur sheds little to no hair and needs particular clipping every six weeks. The fur is thinned and clipped close to the head and body to emphasize the shape. Shave the ears leaving a bobble on the tips. On the legs, the hair is left somewhat longer. Brush the dog frequently and clean the pluck within the ears. Even though regular bathing will not dry out skin, it should not be washed too often or the fur will become dull, which is not considered suitable for the breed. Dogs that are to be shown need good quality of grooming.

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